A helicopter spreads winter rye seed down over a corn field. When the corn is harvested, the rye will remain, enriching the soil and preventing erosion. This technique is called "cover-cropping." The helicopter is used to ensure proper seed coverage, without damaging the corn.

A helicopter spreads winter rye seed down over a corn field. When the corn is harvested, the rye will remain, enriching the soil and preventing erosion. This technique is called "cover-cropping." The helicopter is used to ensure proper seed coverage, without damaging the corn.

Riverside Farms has been the root of our family for more than 160 years. Protecting and preserving the soil and water we rely on is integral to everything we do. Our family and our livelihood depend upon it.

We employ a wide range of conservation practices on our farm. Here are just a few examples...

Cover cropping: we seed down open fields with cover crops to prevent erosion and enrich the soil between seasons

Buffer zones: thick, vegetative buffers line our ditches and waterways to ensure excess storm water is captured before it reaches our rivers or streams

No-till: a technique called "no-till" allows us to plant corn without over-turning the soil, thereby minimizing erosion.

Nutrient injection: we inject nutrients below the surface level of the soil, preventing run-off and maximizing nutrient utilization

Open lands: more than 350 acres (roughly 35%) of our land remains wild, providing habitat for wildlife to enjoy

To read about our partnership with the USDA's National Resource Conservation Service, click here

We are proud to be part of the Champlain Valley Farmers' Coalition, a group of farmers working together to implement best practices for livestock and crops to protect Vermont's waterways.